How early is too early?

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  • #1763666

    rediska
    Participant

    How early  in jiujitsu is too early for tournaments? I’ve been to a handful, medalled though never took first place, but somehow that didn’t matter to me, because my whole family gathered to travel to the location and cheer me on. I remember spending the night at a cheap motel and barely manaing to eat delicious breakfast while being extremely anxious for my upcoming matches. The waiting for half a day is quite a challenge! Now I had a question from a sixteen y.o. beginner, two years into the Art,  asking me, when is she ready to compete? I don’t know what to tell her, because sandbaggers rule the competition arena and she isn’t likely to win, but I think I will she should go for the experience of spending a night and morning in the motel and having everybody cheer for her as she gains confidence in her own abilities.

    #1763667

    christiancastleman
    Participant

    Two years?  I think 6 months is about right time to do first competition.  Hotels have nothing to do with it.  Local tournaments also have beginner divisions that eliminate the sandbagger issue (unless someone sandbags on that too).

    #1763668

    jackjitsu
    Keymaster

    6 months.   Otherwise you risk losing so fast you miss out on competing very much at all.

     

    #1763673

    regaldeagle
    Participant

    If you aren’t a ranked instructor, you shouldn’t be teaching BJJ.  You shouldn’t have students as you are not qualified to teach them or coach them.

    Aren’t you a BJJ white belt?!

    #1763676

    christiancastleman
    Participant

    Agreed White Belts should not teach, but they should compete.  Best to have people start teaching at about Purple belt even if it is part of class and with oversight.  I have been having one of my purples teach parts of classes for us as he preps for brown.

    #1763682

    Dirtyrancher
    Participant

    “Now I had a question from a sixteen y.o. beginner, two years into the Art, asking me, when is she ready to compete? I don’t know what to tell her, because sandbaggers rule the competition arena and she isn’t likely to win,”

    because sandbaggers rule the competition arena and she isn’t likely to win

    because sandbaggers rule the competition arena and she isn’t likely to win

    because sandbaggers rule the competition arena and she isn’t likely to win

    because sandbaggers rule the competition arena and she isn’t likely to win

    ^^ Stupidest reason to keep someone from competing. You want her to win. Pay me, and I will send a medal.

    Sandbaggers… the ulitimate worry for actually competing… come on

    The reason to compete is to learn, the reason to compete is to learn what it is like to have someone trying to kick your ass that you have never met, the reason to compete is to train hard and do your best, the reason to compete is to simulate getting your ass  kicked so that you perform when the time comes.

    THE REASON TO NOT COMPETE IS TO JUGGLE YOUR POSITION SO YOU GET FIRST PLACE BECAUSE YOU AS A COACH SUCKS OR YOUR TEAM SUCKS

    If she competes a lot, she will get better – and that’s a lot better than getting on the ‘excuse train’ – if she competes, it will motivate her to level up. In EVERY aspect of BJJ.

    Sure there will be the ones that will say because she stepped on the mat for 5 mintues, that now she will get raped because everything was wiped clean — bullshit. If it only takes 5 mins of time to wipe away 2 years of training…. your school and training is bunk, bs. whatever.

     

    Just sign the person up. And comment about the important things… the things you said at the end… cheering your teammate on, helping her, making her part of the team.

    She will get a ton from it.

    Come on – the person that started BJJ in your entire area is the closest one to where you live… ask his advice.

    But in the meantime, if the person knows the basic positions, then 3 months is more than enough.

     

    #1763683

    Dirtyrancher
    Participant

    It’s like the “our team doesn’t give blue belts for 3 years, you wouldn’t want to be disgraced by someone from another team ‘owning’ your blue belts”… come on. Seriously? There are teams that can make people serious pan am/world champs in the blue belt division medalists/champions in a year. If your team is so “up in it” then why take 2-3 years?

    #1763684

    Dirtyrancher
    Participant

    3 months, if they train consistently

    19 years if you worry about “sandbaggers rule the competition arena and she isn’t likely to win”

    make it no-gi while you are at it

     

    #1763687

    Girafa
    Participant

    Its highly dependent on the person’s physique but also his mental stability. Ive had someone compete that trained for 2 months, but even though he didn’t win, it sparked his training regime. While I also have a few people train for years and just about ready to do their first competition. Because they fear losing so much, it will scare them from the sport. So didn’t force or ask them to compete at all. And even now I worry about losing a couple of really nice training partners.

    #1763800

    Dirtyrancher
    Participant

    Well – did she compete? or did you talk her out of it?

    #1763804

    rediska
    Participant

    She won gold in the Beginner’s division using the four part submission system that I showed her – my old teacher used to kick my ass with it. Great talent.

    #1763812

    Dirtyrancher
    Participant

    LOL awesome!! –

    btw, which old teacher? Charlie or your Kung-fu teacher?

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 3 days ago by  Dirtyrancher.
    #1763820

    rediska
    Participant

    Lol, neither. I thought you knew. Both Charlie Kohler and the guys from the White Dragon school (Sifu Ming Lao and Mr Lie) are kind of creepy in my opinion, but they are not the ones who dominated me repeatedly. It was Joey Van Bruckle, great athlete and undefeated in MMA, who had a beautiful girlfriend that I had a really stupid crush on. We are still like brother and sister. I sent her a Happy Birthday card on Facebook recently. As for Joey, I learned how to take risks and be strong from him.

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